The Legacy of the Dot-Com Bust

Take yourself back to 2000. Where were you? I spent the year stuck in a Y2K-glitched elevator that refused to open. Just kidding.

If you recall those days, life was pretty insecure in the Web world, as you can see from this chart (source: Businessweek. “Bottoming out?” March 18, 2002, pp. 4.).

What was the net effect of this legacy? You tell me. Did work change after the bubble burst? What did you notice about work? What did you notice about yourself and your own thoughts about work?

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2 responses to “The Legacy of the Dot-Com Bust

  1. Work definitely changed. Hiring was frozen.

    Instead of doing the work of two people, I was doing the work of a team of three.

    The executive whom I reported to (who came to the company after 10 years at Lockheed-Martin) — by his own admission — didn’t understand my job, didn’t care to, and showed it. His attitude caused some of the best people at the company to leave the business.

    Work became something to endure where it had once been something to enjoy.

    The net effect is that I will not work any overtime without the assurance that I will be paid for it, no matter how much I believe in a company or the work.

    I only work with skilled people whom I believe are trustworthy, who have personal and professional integrity, and who demonstrably care about the work and well-being of the people who report to them.

  2. Work definitely changed. Hiring was frozen.

    Instead of doing the work of two people, I was doing the work of a team of three.

    The executive whom I reported to (who came to the company after 10 years at Lockheed-Martin) — by his own admission — didn’t understand my job, didn’t care to, and showed it. His attitude caused some of the best people at the company to leave the business.

    Work became something to endure where it had once been something to enjoy.

    The net effect is that I will not work any overtime without the assurance that I will be paid for it, no matter how much I believe in a company or the work.

    I only work with skilled people whom I believe are trustworthy, who have personal and professional integrity, and who demonstrably care about the work and well-being of the people who report to them.

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