"Allowed" to work from home?

Stumbled across this on WebWorker Daily, a site for telecommuting Web folks:

The number of employees who are allowed to work from home at least one day a month stands at 12.4 million, up 63% in two years.

That got me thinking. “Allowed” to work from home? It’s interesting that we praise this notion of working at home as a perk, an privilege, something to aspire to.

I guess I should be honest. I’m at home, right now, in my bathrobe, sitting in my easy chair with my Macbook on my lap. Allowed to have my eggs while I check my news. Allowed to not get into the shower until I’m good and ready.

But also “allowed” to check my email at all hours. Heck, I was chatting with a colleague until midnight last night. Now that I’ve pulled the plug on full-time work, that sort of thing doesn’t count as “work” — but when I was working it sure did. We’d work out all sorts of workplace problems over IM.

Now would my husband “allow” me to go to work? Hmm. What if we had said “forced” or maybe “required” or perhaps even “choose.”

Words all have power.

Read the original report.

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7 responses to “"Allowed" to work from home?

  1. Karen Quinn Fung

    As a co-op student, I talk pretty cynically about my relationship to my ginormous corporate employer – i.e. They “own” me during work hours, I “clock in” and “clock out”. I think I both subconsciously and very outwardly define my work as a “slave/master” relationship, especially since I know they are getting me at reduced cost through the co-op program. Reminds me of what people say about it being very in vogue in Japan to “look busy,” where the appearance of devotion matters just as much as the actual deliverables. Perhaps this is the difference between those providing services and people whose primary role is to generate value by innovating?

  2. Karen Quinn Fung

    As a co-op student, I talk pretty cynically about my relationship to my ginormous corporate employer – i.e. They “own” me during work hours, I “clock in” and “clock out”. I think I both subconsciously and very outwardly define my work as a “slave/master” relationship, especially since I know they are getting me at reduced cost through the co-op program. Reminds me of what people say about it being very in vogue in Japan to “look busy,” where the appearance of devotion matters just as much as the actual deliverables. Perhaps this is the difference between those providing services and people whose primary role is to generate value by innovating?

  3. What’s interesting is that at the agency I work at the perception is that if I worked from home I’d be unproductive. The reality is quite different. On the few times that I have worked from home, I’ve accomplished way more in that environment then at “work”

    Work is mostly pointless meetings, doublespeak and politicking. But, if I’m there and ‘participating’ (IE, billing hours and hitting deadlines), then management is happy. It’s pretty fucked up that all of my best ideas and ‘work’ have occurred when everyone else has left the office or the team I’m part of has been cut off from the machinations of the workplace for a couple of hours.

  4. What’s interesting is that at the agency I work at the perception is that if I worked from home I’d be unproductive. The reality is quite different. On the few times that I have worked from home, I’ve accomplished way more in that environment then at “work”

    Work is mostly pointless meetings, doublespeak and politicking. But, if I’m there and ‘participating’ (IE, billing hours and hitting deadlines), then management is happy. It’s pretty fucked up that all of my best ideas and ‘work’ have occurred when everyone else has left the office or the team I’m part of has been cut off from the machinations of the workplace for a couple of hours.

  5. Wait ’til you have a kid: you work in the office and you work at home! On the other hand, having a child is also a chance to rediscover play. It’s a delicate balance. I think the optimal mix is to work part-time and then to split your part-time hours between office and home. That leaves 50 percent of your days completely unencumbered for playtime.

  6. Wait ’til you have a kid: you work in the office and you work at home! On the other hand, having a child is also a chance to rediscover play. It’s a delicate balance. I think the optimal mix is to work part-time and then to split your part-time hours between office and home. That leaves 50 percent of your days completely unencumbered for playtime.

  7. Excellent info, I liked it.

    http://www.myhomebizguide.com

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